Programs and Incentives

Explore these tools on your own or contact SelectUSA for assistance

The U.S. federal government offers a range of services and programs for companies that operate in the United States – from general workforce development and energy efficiency grants to industry-specific incentives. State, territorial, and local governments are often the primary source of specific assistance to help business investors get new ventures off the ground or expand their existing operations.

Government Programs

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Federal Interagency Investment Working Group (IIWG)

Have questions about a federal regulation?  Learn how the IIWG can help you navigate the U.S. regulatory system and connect with the right federal-level contacts.

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Federal Programs Database

Want to learn more about federal business programs and incentives? Browse this database of programs from U.S. government agencies designed to support businesses in the United States.

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State Economic Development Organizations

Interested in learning about different regions? Explore the assistance offered by state and territorial economic development organizations directly at the source.  

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State Business Incentives Database


Interested in conveniently searching state and territorial incentives? Browse this database developed by the Council for Community and Economic Research (C2ER).

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Other Resources

The U.S. Commercial Service (USCS)

The U.S. Commercial Service (USCS), a part of the International Trade Administration at the U.S. Department of Commerce, offers companies a full range of expertise in international trade, marketing, and finance at every stage of the exporting process. Companies can find local assistance at U.S. Export Assistance Centers (USEACS) in more than 100 locations across the United States and globally in 75 international offices. These trade specialists counsel companies on the steps involved in exporting, help assess product export potential, identify markets, locate potential overseas partners, and resolve customs clearance and other trade-related issues. 

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